January is the month of reflection for us here on the farm. The production planning for the season is largely done, the days are short, the seeds are trickling in from their far-flung sources, and the vegetables grow slow as molasses in, well, January. There’s not much thrill on the farm this time of year, but that doesn’t mean it’s anywhere near boring. Tomatoes are already being seeded and beds prepped for the inevitable spring. The momentum never truly stops when farming; it only changes direction.

 – Our chickens are laying very few eggs due to the extremely short days and cold weather, so don’t expect to see more than a few dozen available in the market each weekend.

– Even though we’re deep in the midwinter slump, our arugula, gourmet greens, and lettuce mix are all producing very well. They should all be available from now until summer warmth stops their growth.

– Hakurei turnips are growing exceedingly well in our high tunnels, and we’re just harvesting the last of our outdoor plantings.

– Our French Breakfast radish plantings have had spotty germination, but they should be available throughout February.

– Kale and collards are both coming into maturity and should be available until they flower in May.

– Peas are starting to vine vigorously and should be in the market by the end of February.

– Little gem lettuce is heading up nicely and will be available this week.

– Spinach, though an always difficult crop for us, is coming in as a trickle and should continue to do so for a month or so.

– Our storage carrots are still looking great and should be available through at least March, with bunches of fresh carrots available starting in early March or so.

We’re getting down to the last of our cabbages so don’t expect them to stick around for more than a couple of weeks.

Alex Knight

Alex Knight

Production Manager

Alex Knight is an Anarchist, Seed Saver, and generally plant-obsessed weirdo who can usually be found foraging the rich coves and dry ridges of Appalachia.

 

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